What did Jesus say about Money (Part 4 of 4)

I have always wanted to methodically go through the gospel accounts and take a look at just what Jesus said about money and possessions.  Recently, I found the time to do just that.  The following four part series will look at the teachings, events, parables, and people the scripture records in the gospels of Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John. 

If you are interested in a quick guide (of all four parts) to print out for your Bible or records, I would be happy to email you one for free.  Contact me here (PDF, one page front and back.  Perfect to print, fold, and place in your Bible).

PEOPLE ———-

Judas Betrayal (Matt. 26:14-16) (Mk. 14:10-11) (Lk. 22:3-6), money later returned (Matt. 27:3-10)

Zaccheus (Lk. 19:1-10)

Mary (with costly perfume) (Jn. 12:1-8) (Matt. 26:6-13) (Mk. 14:3-9)

Widow with two copper coins (Mk. 12:41-44) (Lk. 21:1-4)

Pharisees (lovers of money) (Lk. 16:14)

Rich young ruler (Matt. 19:16-26) (Mk. 10:17-30) (Lk. 18:18-30)

Mary and Joseph were not rich: Jesus was born in a manger (Lk. 2:7), and they offered doves as sacrifice instead of rams when going to dedicate their first born (Lk. 2:24)

Roman guards bribed by chief priests to lie about Jesus resurrection (Matt. 28:11-15)

The poor
- God helping the poor not the rich (Lk. 1:53)
- Servants are the ones chosen to see Jesus’ first miracle (Jn. 2:5-11)
- “Poor have the gospel preach to them” is a prophecy predicting the Messiah (Matt. 11:5) (Lk. 7:22)
- The poor you always have with you (Jn. 12:8) (Matt. 26:11) (Mk. 14:7)
- Even unto the least of these teaching (Matt. 25:31-46)
- Generous to the poor is an indication of being “clean” inside (Lk. 11:41)

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What did Jesus say about Money (Part 3 of 4)

I have always wanted to methodically go through the gospel accounts and take a look at just what Jesus said about money and possessions.  Recently, I found the time to do just that.  The following four part series will look at the teachings, events, parables, and people the scripture records in the gospels of Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John. 

If you are interested in a quick guide (of all four parts) to print out for your Bible or records, I would be happy to email you one for free.  Contact me here (PDF, one page front and back.  Perfect to print, fold, and place in your Bible).

PARABLES ———-

The talents (Matt. 25:14-30)
The minas (Lk. 19:11-27)
The laborers in the vineyard (Matt. 20:1-16)
The lost coin (Lk. 15:8-10)
The prodigal son (Lk. 15:11-32)
The unrighteous steward (Lk. 16:1-9)
The good steward (Lk. 12-41-48)
The wedding feast (Lk. 14:16-24) (Matt. 22:1-14)
The good Samaritan (Lk. 10:25-37)
The rich fool (Lk. 12:13-21)
The rich man and Lazarus (Lk. 16:19-31)
The scattered seed  (Matt. 13:22) (Lk. 8:14)

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Christian Financial Alliance: Should Christians give while getting out of debt?

The Christian Financial Alliance  was created to help readers.  The idea is this:  Create a panel of biblical finance gurus.  People who take seriously the call to teach the Bible accurately with grace and truth.  Once a month, we post a question with a response from our panel to provide you with well-rounded, sound, biblical advice.  For more on the Christian Financial Alliance (or to join our team) click here.

“How do you believe a Christian should approach giving while trying to get out of debt?”

“I think you can do both if you work at it. We lived frugally enough that we paid off our mortgage, saved, and gave all at the same time. That said, many people can’t do all three to the extent they would like, especially at the start. But I would still suggest they do all three — just at lower levels than they may like. Then as their income increases and they cut costs, they can pay off even more debt until it is gone completely.” – FreeMoneyFinance.com

“I think a Christian must do everything possible to honor the Lord first in their finances.  This requires consistent prayer and seeking spirit filled wisdom.  I believe that if we honor God first He will provide for our needs and that may mean providing the required resources to pay off debt.  I also think a Christian in debt, that doesn’t have a debt payment plan, should seek the advice of a Christian budget counselor to help set up a budget and create a plan to get out of debt.” - OneMoneyDesign.com

“I believe a Christian who is currently in debt should find creative ways to give in small amounts, while prioritizing getting out of debt. This will do two things. First, it will continue to feed the spirit of generosity and prevent him/her from buying into consumerism. Second, it will also help free up finances in the future, which he/she can give without feeling conflicted.” – ProvidentPlan.com

“Generosity, as God intended it, flows from the heart as a result of our love for the Father and our fellow man.  In light of this, a Christian that seeks to live as the Bible instructs should make generosity a priority.  While this may slow the ‘getting out of debt’ process (numerically speaking), it shows that spiritual changes accompany our financial re-tooling.  If we sacrifice giving to get out of debt, we likely will be just as stingy when we are out of debt (because few, if any, spiritual changes took place).  Therefore, if we really want to be transformed at a soul level (rather than just being smarter with our money), we should give while getting out of debt.  Giving smaller amounts of money and giving from our time and talents will allow God to transform us into generous people so that when larger amounts of money are at our disposal, we will handle them as we ought.” – DollarsandDoctrine.com

“First, get out of debt.  Being in debt does no good to the Christian community.  Cut expenses and destroy your debt.  Once you’re debt free, God can truly use your resources and use you to bless others.  It’s as simple as that in my opinion!” – FreeMoneyWisdom.com

“I think that giving is a matter of the heart, and that God wants us to have a generous nature – and to give freely of ourselves and the money he has entrusted us with. I think that giving is not only a monetary thing, but also a spiritual act of worship to God, and as such we should do our best to still give while we’re in debt. There may be situations where you have gotten yourself so far into debt that you may need to lower your giving for a time, but I still believe we should do our best to give in any and all circumstances. Each man should give what he has decided in his heart to give, not reluctantly or under compulsion, for God loves a cheerful giver.2 Corinthians 9:7” – BibleMoneyMatters.com

“I think that a Christian should ask why they are in debt in the first place.  They should figure out the underlying cause and address that first.  Since generosity is a matter of the heart, I think that it can and should be continued even if a person is trying to get out of debt.” – FaithandFinance.org

“There are three types of people who come to mind, each with a different answer.  First, I’ve met lots of people who didn’t think they could give while trying to get out of debt, but if they were really honest about it there were expenses in their lives they weren’t willing to give up.  I think a lot of people could get a lot more serious about their spending in order to speed up the process of getting out of debt while still giving generously.  I’ve met people who have sold homes they really couldn’t afford or go without an Internet connection at home to make their finances work.  The second type is the person who truly has gotten serious about their expenses and honestly can’t give at least a full tithe.  For them, I say go back to the example of Cain and Abel and give what for them is a choice gift.  In this case, it isn’t so much about percentages; it’s about the heart.  The third type is the person who isn’t even able to cover their basic needs.  For people in that situation, I believe it’s one of those seasons when the church really should be giving to them.” – Matt @ SoundMindInvesting.com

For more on the Christian Financial Alliance (or to join our team) click here.

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What did Jesus say about Money (Part 2 of 4)

I have always wanted to methodically go through the gospel accounts and take a look at just what Jesus said about money and possessions.  Recently, I found the time to do just that.  The following four part series will look at the teachings, events, parables, and people the scripture records in the gospels of Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John. 

If you are interested in a quick guide (of all four parts) to print out for your Bible or records, I would be happy to email you one for free.  Contact me here (PDF, one page front and back.  Perfect to print, fold, and place in your Bible).

EVENTS ———-

Jesus’ early life Spent “settled” (Matt. 2:23, 4:13)

Temptation in the wilderness Jesus offered all the kingdoms of the world (Matt. 4:8) (Lk. 4:5-8)

“Follow Me”
- Disciples left everything (Mk. 1:16-29, Matt. 4:18-22) (Lk. 4:38-39) (Lk. 5:11) (Lk. 5:27-28)
- Had a large gathering after (Lk. 5:29) (Mk. 2:14) (Matt. 9:10)

Left or Liquidated?  Disciples left all they had to follow Christ, but return to “normal” life, work, and possessions after crucifixion (but before resurrection):
- Disciples scattered when Jesus was arrested—each to their own home (Jn. 16:32)
- John takes Mary into his household after crucifixion (Jn. 19:27)
- Peter went back to his home (Lk. 24:12)
- The disciples return to their homes (Jn. 20:10)
- Some of the disciples return to their work (Jn. 21:3-11)

Jesus and disciples had financial resources/support
- Disciples had money to buy food (Jn. 4:8)
- People contribute to Jesus and the disciples out of private means (Lk. 8:3)
- Some women travel with Jesus and care for his needs (Mk. 15:41)
- Last supper eaten at someone’s house (furnished and provided for) (Matt. 26:17-19) (Lk. 22:7-13) (Mk. 14:12-16)
- Money box used to buy what they needed and give to poor (Jn. 13:29) (Jesus gave to the poor)
- Joseph of Arimathea (a rich man) supplies Jesus’ tomb (Matt. 27:57-60) (Mk. 15:43-46) (Lk. 23:50-56) (Jn. 19:38-42)

The Son of Man has no home (on earth) (Matt. 8:20) (Lk. 9:58)

The worker is worthy of his wages Disciples sent out without money belts because all will be provided (Matt. 10:9-11) (Mk. 6:8-10) (Lk. 9:1-4) (Lk. 10:4-12) but this call is later reversed (Lk. 22:35-38)

Feeding of 5,000 (Mk. 6:34-44) (Matt 14:14-21) (Lk. 9:12-17) (Jn. 6:1-14)

Feeding of 4,000 (Matt. 15:32-39) (Mk. 8:1-10)

Cleansing of the Temple (Jn. 2:13-17) (Matt. 21:12-13) (Lk. 19:45-46) (Mk. 11:15-17)

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What did Jesus say about Money (Part 1 of 4)

I have always wanted to methodically go through the gospel accounts and take a look at just what Jesus said about money and possessions.  Recently, I found the time to do just that.  The following four part series will look at the teachings, events, parables, and people the scripture records in the gospels of Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John. 

If you are interested in a quick guide (of all four parts) to print out for your Bible or records, I would be happy to email you one for free.  Contact me here (PDF, one page front and back.  Perfect to print, fold, and place in your Bible).

TEACHINGS ———-

Fruit in keeping with repentance (John the Baptist) (Lk. 3:10-14) Be generous (11), be fair/have integrity (12-13), don’t extort and be content (14)

Sermon on the mount Blessed are the poor (Lk. 6:20), give to those who ask/take and lend expecting nothing back (Lk. 6:29-30,34-35) (Matt. 5:40-42), give and it will come back to you (Lk. 6:38), give in secret (Matt. 6:2-4), lay up treasure in heaven not on earth because where your treasure is your heart is also (Matt. 6:19-21), can’t serve two masters (Matt. 6:24), anxiety/provision of necessities (Matt. 6:24-34)

Provision
- Can receive nothing except what we are given from heaven (Jn. 3:27)
- Don’t worry about food, clothes, shelter, just trust like the birds of the field and seek first His kingdom and all will be added (Lk. 12:22-34)
- Daily bread (Lk. 11:3) (Matt. 6:11)
- God’s provision is fully supplied (Lk. 22:35)
- Providing for family (Matt. 15:3-6) (Mk. 7:6-13) (Matt 15:3-9)

Heavenly Reward
- Fruitful reaping (spiritual) gains wages and fruit in eternal life (Jn. 4:35-36)
- When you leave things behind for Christ, you will be repaid in the next life (Mk. 10:29-30) (Matt. 19:29) (Lk. 18:29-30)

Tithing and the Pharisees Tithed herbs but neglected weightier things (Lk. 11:42) (Lk. 11:42) (Matt. 23:23)

Debt as a metaphor for sin/salvation (Lk. 7:40-50) (Matt. 18:23-35)

The gospel is a treasure (Matt. 13:44-46) (Matt. 13:52)

You are worth more than many sparrows (Matt. 10:29-31) (Lk. 12:6-7)

Gain world/lose soul (Matt. 16:26) (Mk. 8:36) (Lk. 9:25) (Lk. 17:33)

Taxes
- Render to Caesar (Matt. 22:16-22) (Mk. 12:13-17) (Lk. 20:21-26), Temple tax (Matt 17:24-27)
- Jesus falsely accused of teaching not to pay taxes (Lk. 23:2)

Possessions/theft are used as a metaphor for spiritual warfare (Lk. 11:17-22) (Mk. 3:23-27) (Matt. 12:25-29)

The cost of discipleship Must be willing to give up life and possessions (Lk. 14:25-33)

Faithful with little things, faithful with much (Lk. 16:10-13)

Purity of heart
- Loving God is more than burnt offerings and sacrifices (Mk. 12:33-34)
- Swearing by gold in the temple rather than the temple itself (Matt. 23:16-18)
- Treasure is where your heart is (Lk. 12:34) (Matt. 6:21)

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Christian Financial Alliance: Non-Financial Stewardship

The Christian Financial Alliance  was created to help readers.  The idea is this:  Create a panel of biblical finance gurus.  People who take seriously the call to teach the Bible accurately with grace and truth.  Once a month, we post a question with a response from our panel to provide you with well-rounded, sound, biblical advice.  For more on the Christian Financial Alliance (or to join our team) click here.

 

“Other than ‘time, talents, and treasures’, what is an area God has led you to be a better steward?”

“With my health. It’s something that most people don’t think about as a stewardship responsibility, but to me it is. God gave me this body so that I could accomplish His purposes, and I can’t do that if it’s weak, tired, and run-down.” – FreeMoneyFinance.com

“I think God asks me to serve my family and specifically, my children.  Of course this involves time, talents and treasures, but God requires us, as faithful stewards, to teach children principles of stewardship.  It’s become increasingly important to teach my children principles of earning, giving, spending and saving in our house as they get older and understand money is what is used to buys things.  I’ve learned this is definitely a process and takes time and consistent teaching.  As with adults, children don’t learn these principles over night.” - OneMoneyDesign.com

“One area in which I have been led to be a better steward is in care of the environment. While I still have a long ways to go in reducing my carbon footprint, I have realized the importance of preserving God’s creation. I have become more conscious of it as I do simple things: reducing the heat, growing a small garden, and commuting to work by bike in the summer.” – ProvidentPlan.com

“”I believe God is challenging me to be a better steward of the gospel (and the purity of the real, biblical message of the gospel).  It seems everywhere I turn, I am challenged to take more seriously the call to proclaim the good news to those around me.  I live in the so-called ‘Bible-belt’ and assume that ‘everyone’ has heard the gospel (which is really nothing more than an excuse).  Evangelism is not a natural strength or gift of mine, but is recently an area where God is calling me to mature.” – DollarsandDoctrine.com

“Lately, I’ve been challenged by the Lord to truly cherish my quiet times and make it a quality time with Him.  I tend to get distracted with other things like building my online business and ESPN.  Instead, God keeps challenging me to really place all my focus with the Lord and let Him speak to my heart.” – FreeMoneyWisdom.com

“I’ve been led to be a better steward in the area of the relationships God has given to me. Whether it is the relationship with my wife, my son or my extended family, I think we’re called to be a Godly example, to be loving, kind and caring towards those who have been placed in our lives, and entrusted to our care.  Everything we have and every person we have in our lives is created by God and have been placed in our lives for a reason.   But who am I, and who are my people, that we should be able to give as generously as this? Everything comes from you, and we have given you only what comes from your hand.  1 Chronicles 29:14 (NIV)” - BibleMoneyMatters.com

“I’ve been challenged to be a better steward of my relationships.  We’re only given so much time on this earth to connect with others, so making the best of that time is an important aspect of stewardship.” – FaithandFinance.org

“My health.  I’ve never had any significant health issues, but I don’t want to take my health for granted.  So, I’ve become a consistent runner and I’m getting more intentional about what I eat and what I don’t eat.  The final health-related frontier for me is sleep.  I’m up early with rare exceptions since I’m a morning person (plus we have have young kids who never sleep in!).  But I have a hard time disciplining myself to get to bed at a decent time.  There’s always one more thing I want to do.” – Matt @ SoundMindInvesting.com

For more on the Christian Financial Alliance (or to join our team) click here.

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Christian Giving Principles (2 Corinthians 9)

(This is a post I wrote for onemoneydesign.com)

The largest discussion of Christian giving in the entire New Testament is found in 2 Cor. 8 & 9.  I have always wanted to tackle this passage in an extensive way.  Recently, I found the time to do just that.  Rather than provide a lengthy commentary on the passage, I decided to break it up into principles in the same order that Paul himself presents the topic.  I hope it benefits your walk with Christ and your desire to manage your money to His glory.

 Chapter 9

• Giving can stir others to give: “For I know your eagerness to help, and I have been boasting about it to the Macedonians, telling them that since last year you in Achaia were ready to give; and your enthusiasm has stirred most of them to action.” (9:2, NIV) Jesus’ command to give “in secret” was intended to prevent us from giving in order to be noticed by men.  I don’t believe this means that all contributions in all cases should be kept silent.  Clearly we see Paul making generosity public to stir others to give.  Again, the motive of publicity here is to stir others to action, not to impress them (thus, keeping in line with Jesus’ teaching).

• Generous desires can dwindle: “So that the same would be ready as a bountiful gift and not affected by covetousness.” (9:5, NASB) How often have we promised (either to someone or ourselves) that we would give, yet when giving time came…our hearts had changed.  Paul is trying to encourage the Corinthians to avoid a gift “grudgingly given.” (9:5, NIV)  We ought to recognize that our hearts need prompting to continue to be generous over the long-haul, and we should take caution to fight against the things (like covetousness) that stifle the fire of God’s Spirit within us.

• Stinginess and generosity return to us:  “Whoever sows sparingly will also reap sparingly, and whoever sows generously will also reap generously.” (9:6, NIV).  In a few verses, Paul will explain why this principle exists, yet the Bible consistently teaches that stinginess and generosity are returned by God in kind.  This shows us that generosity is always in our best interest.  The most common reason for our stinginess (whether we will admit it or not) is that we think withholding increases the amount of resources we have available to us.  Yet, the Bible clearly teaches the opposite: sowing sparingly will lead to reaping sparingly (and reaping sparingly usually leads to sowing even more sparingly…and the cycle continues).  Sow generously.

• Christian generosity is purposeful, from the heart, and cheerful: “Each of you should give what you have decided in your heart to give, not reluctantly or under compulsion, for God loves a cheerful giver.”(9:7, NIV)  Probably one of the most quoted verses in the New Testament regarding giving, I believe this has everything to do with transforming our hearts–giving us a glimpse of Christ in us.  We should give cheerfully from the heart.  If we think this verse is a license not to give, then we are ones who sow sparingly (and back to [8:8] where Paul calls our giving a test of our love).  Do verses like this challenge us to increase the eternal purposes and joy in our hearts to give?  Or, do we feel relieved to find a “loophole” in the awfully troublesome command to love others more than ourselves (does God love a cheerful miser)?  Certainly this verse should challenge Christian leaders to lead their flock towards heart-transformation, and away from compulsive, manipulative, arm-twisting tactics to increase contributions, but I believe the overall purpose of this verse (set in the context of the surrounding 39 verses) has everything to do with transforming us into purposeful, strategic, joyful, and generous givers.

• God provides all sufficiency and abundance for our giving: “God is able to bless you abundantly, so that in all things at all times, having all that you need, you will abound in every good work…Now he who supplies seed to the sower and bread for food will also supply and increase your store of seed…You will be enriched in every way so that you can be generous on every occasion.” (9:8-11, NIV)  Christian giving is supplied by nothing less than God Himself.  He will bless abundantly, in all things, in all times, in every way, so that we will have all we need and still be able to be generous on every occassion!  How inspiring is this!  Often our stinginess is attributed to the fact that we look to ourselves to provide what is needed to give.  If only we will look to God, we will find limitless resources to pour out.

• Generosity’s return is for the good of others: “So that…you will abound in every good work..they have freely scattered their gifts to the poor…so that you can be generous on every occasion.” (9:8-11, NIV)  Often misunderstood by prosperity gospel thinkers, God’s word clearly attests that such generous resources are given from above so that we may give generously.  Generous heavenly provision is designed to flow through our hands and out into the world.  If our hearts only desire is to store up treasure for ourselves, we are operating outside of the principle being discussed here.

• Generosity increases righteousness: “As it is written…their righteousness endures forever…will enlarge the harvest of your righteousness.” (9:9-10, NIV)  This passage quotes Psalm 112, a Psalm dedicated to describing righteous living.  Giving needs to be an integral part of our desire to increase in righteousness.

• Generosity results in thanksgiving and praise: “Your generosity will result in thanksgiving to God.  This service that you perform is…also overflowing in many expressions of thanks to God…others will praise God…for your generosity in sharing with them and with everyone else.” (9:11-12, NIV)  Our giving will allow thankful praise to rise to our heavenly Father.  When we give in His name, we allow others to worship God in a deeper way.

• Generosity can fully provide all needs: ”For the ministry of this service is…fully supplying the needs of the saints.” (9:12, NASB) By God’s design, the process of Christian generosity is capable of fully supplying the needs of the saints.  Let us engage such a noble honor.

• Generosity is “proof” of obedience: “Because of the service by which you have proved yourselves, others will praise God for the obedience that accompanies your confession of the gospel of Christ” (9:13, NIV)  Paul claimed the Corinthians would prove their obedience to the gospel through their generous giving.  Not being legalistic, we need to challenge ourselves to look honestly at how much “proof” of obedience to God’s word we see in our life.  This will convict any honest Christian, and lead us to where Paul goes next…grace.

• Ends with grace: “The surpassing grace God has given you.” (9:14, NIV)  Paul began and ended his challenge to the church at Corinth speaking of God’s grace.  There is a great lesson in this.  Our giving, must begin and end with God’s grace.

• Ends with praise: “Thanks be to God for his indescribable gift!” (9:15, NIV)  Proper Christian giving will always result in praise to God.  We can assure our hearts that we are following Him fully when He gets the praise and glory for our participation in His generosity.

[Click here to read chapter 8]

For more of my thoughts on giving, pick up a copy of my most recent book, The Secret of Generosity.

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Christian Financial Alliance: Tithing

The Christian Financial Alliance  was created to help readers.  The idea is this:  Create a panel of biblical finance gurus.  People who take seriously the call to teach the Bible accurately with grace and truth.  Once a month, we post a question with a response from our panel to provide you with well-rounded, sound, biblical advice.  For more on the Christian Financial Alliance (or to join our team) click here.

 

“What are your convictions regarding the practice of tithing?”

“I believe that 10% of gross income is the minimum a person or family should give to their local church. Call it a “tithe” or “generous giving” (if you hate tithing), but either way it nets out the same. there are many resons for my feelings on this but the two main ones are 1) tithing was and Old Testament standard and we’re called to a HIGHER standard in the New Testament (Matthew 5:21-48) and 2) Jesus endorsed the practice of tithing (Matthew 23:23).” – FreeMoneyFinance.com

“As it relates to tithing I don’t have any personal convictions other than I wish my wife and I would have tithed much earlier in our marriage.  The tithe has been a great starting point for our giving and helps us put God first in our finances.  It has helped us lay our finances at the Lord’s feet when many times our natural instincts were to take complete control.  We’re actively praying about increasing our giving for a church project but it will be in addition to the tithe.” - OneMoneyDesign.com

“I understand tithing as being more important for what it reminds us of, than the act itself. Tithing (in my opinion) should never be just about a certain percentage or strict regulations, but about a spirit of gratitude and giving. Real people’s life situations and the inability to pay the traditional 10% remind us that tithing cannot be that simple. I see it as an voluntary act that, when followed, teaches us discipline and gratitude for what has been given.” – ProvidentPlan.com

“In my experience, nothing stirs the pot quite like the word “tithe“.  Sadly, in all the theological debating, I think we often miss the point entirely (kind of like the Pharisees did in Matt. 23:23).  Regardless of what a Christian may think of tithing, the call to give generously, support those who minister to us, participate in the work of the gospel, and care for those in need is taken further in the New Testament than the Old Testament.  In light of this, I think Christians are free in Christ to consult the Word and the leading of the Holy Spirit to guide their specific approach to giving, but not giving (or giving next to nothing) is far from the calling of scripture.  Tithing is simple, consistent, and a great first step towards living generously for any Christian led to do so.” – DollarsandDoctrine.com

“I strongly believe that tithing should be looked at from a “holistic” viewpoint.  Give what you can financially, but then also give of your resources and time.  People place way too much emphasis on just money.  If you are simply giving your money to the church, you are missing the point.  We are called to give and keep on giving, but not just money.” – FreeMoneyWisdom.com

“Tithing is one of those issues that invariably will bring up a big debate.   There are those who believe we should give 10% of all we have to God as they did in the old testament. There are others who say that under the new covenant we’re to use Christ as our example, and give out of gratitude to him for all he has done for us.  I tend to be in the latter camp, not believing in a strict legalistic 10% or other percentage, but instead believing that we should give as we feel directed by the Holy Spirit, which in many cases may be more than 10%!BibleMoneyMatters.com

“”I think tithing 10% is a good starting point, but having a hard and fast rule is too legalistic to me.  Generosity isn’t measured by zeros, it’s measured by how sincere a person is.” – FaithandFinance.org

“Tithing has been a controversial topic in churches for years, but we maintain that faithful tithing is an essential element of God’s master plan for our financial lives. The Old Testament is clear about God’s intention for His people to tithe, and both Jesus and Paul made statements in the New Testament that re-affirmed the importance of giving for Christians. If God is truly the owner of all of our wealth, then He has the right to instruct us in how we deal with it. Tithing is essential in the function and success of the local church; more importantly, though, the practice of tithing works to bring our hearts into deeper communion with the heart of God. Because where our treasures are, there our hearts are also.” – GodMoneyMe.com

For more on the Christian Financial Alliance (or to join our team) click here.

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